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Quantum Cat Designs apparel is not available in all of the fabrics listed below.  We provide these care instructions both for the Quantum Cat shirts and to help you care for your entire wardrobe.

 

Cotton

 

Cotton is a very soft and breathable fabric, but it is prone to shrinkage, color bleeding, and losing its shape over time. Cotton is also not the sturdiest of fabrics. If you want to keep a cotton garment in the best possible shape for a longer time, wash it in cold water on a gentle cycle.

 

Clothesline or hanger drying is recommended. If you choose to put your cotton garment in the dryer, use medium heat, not high heat.

 

If ironing cotton, and the iron does not have a designated cotton setting, use steam and high heat.

 

Polyester

 

A polyester garment is fairly sturdy and not prone to shrinking or color bleeding. Polyester can be washed in warm water with no ill effects. Nevertheless, to help keep the garment in good condition,  I recommend washing a polyester garment in cold water on a gentle cycle.

 

Polyester can be given even the hottest dryer ride and not shrink. For virtually all garments, however, line/hang drying is best to keep garments in good condition. (You know that lint screen in your dryer that gets full with about every load? That's your fabric!) If you choose to put your polyester garment in a dryer, medium heat is recommended. Anti-static sheets are helpful, since polyester is more prone to static cling than are natural fabrics.

 

If the iron does not have a dedicated polyester setting, iron it on a low setting, with steam, while the fabric is damp.

 

Acrylic

 

Acrylic fiber cloth can be treated the same as polyester for practical intents and purposes. Acrylic is not very prone to shrinking or color bleeding, so washing in warm or even hot water is okay. Still, the usual recommendation to wash fabrics in cold water for optimal life applies to acrylic too.

 

Even a hot visit to a dryer is not going to shrink an acrylic fabric garment. Yet again, for optimal fabric care, line/hang drying is better. Acrylic is prone to static, so if you choose to machine dry, use anti-static dryer sheets. A medium dryer setting is recommended.

 

Acrylic does not take ironing very well. If you choose to iron an acrylic fabric, use the lowest iron setting, without any steam. Some people even put a thin piece of cotton fabric between the acrylic garment and the iron, for added protection.

 

Milk

 

A milk-fiber fabric has a degree of softness that is unparalleled by any other fabric type. A true casein protein-fiber fabric is not very sturdy compared to other types of cloth. Hand washing in cold water with the gentlest detergent available is highly recommended. If you do put your milk fiber garment in a washing machine, use the gentlest cycle and cold water.

 

Line/hang drying is a must. No visits to a dryer for a milk-fiber garment!

 

Ironing is also not recommended. If you choose to iron milk-fiber cloth, use the lowest possible setting, and no steam.

 

Silk

 

Silk is not as rugged and sturdy as some other fibers. Washing in cold water on a gentle cycle is recommended. Silk can shrink and bleed colors pretty badly.

 

Line/hang drying a silk garment is definitely recommended. If you do put your silk garment in a dryer, a low dryer setting is wise.

 

Silk also takes a low iron setting, with no steam. If your iron has a dedicated silk or delicates setting, use that.

 

Hemp

 

Hemp is generally a sturdy fabric and not very prone to shrinkage or bleeding colors. Washing in cold water is still recommended to keep the hemp garment in good shape for as long as possible. 

Even a hot dryer ride is not likely to shrink a hemp garment too much. If you do choose to put a hemp garment in the dryer, a medium setting is recommended. 

Hemp takes the highest iron setting, which is usually labeled the "linen" setting. Hemp is best ironed with steam, and while the fabric is damp. 

Cottonized Hemp

 

If you have a cottonized hemp garment—made of shortened hemp fibers spun on cotton-based thread and weaving equipment, it is best to treat this cloth as you would cotton. A cottonized hemp garment is more prone to shrinking than a regular hemp garment. Wash in cold water.

 

Line/hang drying is recommended. If you choose machine dry, select a medium temperature setting.

 

Ironing cottonized hemp at a little lower temperature than a regular hemp garment, and with steam, is best. If there is a cotton setting on the iron, use that.

 

Linen

 

Linen is generally a rather durable fabric. Linen can be washed in warm or hot water without any problems. Yet the usual "wash in cold water for optimal life" is still recommended.

 

Linen is not very prone to shrinking, so a very hot dryer setting is unlikely to harm a linen garment. Still, a dryer setting of medium is recommended. Line/hang dry to keep a linen garment in the best condition over time.

 

Linen requires the highest iron setting, with steam. Iron when the cloth is damp.

 

Wool

 

Wool generally holds its shape well and is a sturdy fabric. To avoid shrinkage, washing in cold water is recommended.

 

Line/hang drying is best. If ever a wool garment is machine dried, a low or medium setting is recommended.

 

If ironing wool and there is no wool setting, choose a medium temperature, and use steam.

 

Rayon

 

Rayon has some virtues as a fabric, but strength and durability are not among them. Rayon loses 60% of its strength when wet, and it has the lowest elasticity of any textile fiber. Hand wash rayon in cold water with a mild detergent. If you instead choose to machine wash a rayon garment, use a gentle cycle with cold water and a mild detergent.

 

Line/hang dry.  Dryers are not recommended for rayon. If you put your rayon garment in a dryer, be sure it is set to the lowest heat.

 

Rayon does not like to be ironed and is known to easily discolor when ironed.  If you must iron it, the lowest temperature setting, without steam, is best.

 

Bamboo

 

A bamboo fiber garment generally has the same care characteristics as a linen or hemp garment. Bamboo is not very prone to shrinkage and color bleeding and is generally a sturdy fabric. Washing on warm or hot settings is not likely to harm a bamboo garment. As usual, for optimal fabric care, washing on a cold setting is still recommended.

 

Line/hang drying is recommended. If you choose to machine dry your bamboo garment, use a medium setting.

 

The linen setting on an iron is best for a bamboo garment. If your iron does not have a dedicated linen setting, use a high temperature setting, with steam.

 

Cottonized Bamboo

 

Cottonized bamboo is cloth made from bamboo fibers cut short, made into thread, and then woven on cotton-based textile equipment. With regard to fabric care, you may consider a cottonized bamboo garment the same as a cotton garment. Cold water washing is recommended.

 

Line/hang drying is also recommended. If you choose to put your cottonized bamboo garment in a dryer, use a medium setting.

 

If ironing cottonized bamboo, use the cotton setting or a high temperature setting, with steam. 

 

Banana Fiber

 

For care purposes, consider textiles made of banana fiber as if they were silk. Banana fibers are not the sturdiest of textiles. Banana cloth is somewhat prone to shrinking and bleeding colors. Wash in cold water on a gentle cycle.

 

Line/hang drying is the best way to go. If you do choose to machine dry your banana fiber garment, a low dryer setting is best.

 

If you iron banana-fiber clothing, a low iron setting with no steam is recommended.

 

Piña

Piña a bit stiffer than some other fabrics, but fairly sturdy. Cold-water wash is recommended. 

Line/hang drying is best. If you choose to machine dry, medium heat is recommended.

 

Iron piña at low temperature, using steam, and while the fabric is still a bit damp.